Preventative Dentistry

Caring for your smile

Generally speaking, the happiest, calmest patients are those who are well informed about their dental health and the importance of preventive care. This is why we place such a high priority on patient education. We continually strive to make sure you are fully aware of your treatment options. We provide you with clear definitions in non-dental terms, and we offer a range of brochures for you to further your own dental knowledge. In addition, we use intra-oral cameras, digital photography and imaging software as part of our patient communication program.

  • Breath Treatment
  • Cleaning or Hygiene
  • Dental Sealants
  • Mouthguards
  • Nightguards
  • Patient Education
  • Regular Checkups
  • Snoreguards

How Your Oral Health Affects Your General Health

If you think about it, it makes perfect sense: poor oral health is linked to poor physical health. How so? Well, consider the big picture: your mouth is the gateway to the rest of the body and its systems. If the mouth has a chronic infection or disease, then your entire body may be indirectly or directly exposed to those bacteria. Not to mention your ability to eat is compromised and also your nutrition. Furthermore, the resources needed for your general health to function will be diverted to handle the chronic infection, weakening the overall natural protection your other systems typically enjoy. Research documents connections between periodontal disease and poor heart health, resulting in increased risk of stroke, as well as diabetes, problem pregnancies, respiratory diseases and osteoporosis in women. What’s more, some studies indicate that those who lose all their natural teeth may have a much shorter lifespan.

So what’s the answer? If you want to up your odds of a happy, healthy life, treat your body with respect and put your money (and effort) where your mouth is. Try starting with the basics: learn the latest tips, techniques, and tools for top notch oral hygiene, when you are here for you next cleaning appointment. Then, branch out: incorporate a healthy diet, exercise, fresh air, and regular rest. Eliminate unhealthy habits that are counterproductive. And remember, taking care of your teeth means better well-being, and it means your body will be better able to take care of itself.

Gum Disease

tooth with and without periodontal disease“Soft-tissue management” is a phrase that has gained recognition in recent years. Essentially, this term refers to the care of your gums or periodontal tissues. Our dental team has studied this area extensively so we are able to successfully treat and prevent gum disease.

  • Charting & Diagnostic Services
  • In-Office Therapy

Maybe It Is Your Problem

It hides in your mouth, destroying gum tissue and teeth, and it can lead to strokes, heart attacks, and pregnancy complications. Don’t think it’s your problem? Conservative estimates report that up to 80 percent of the population unknowingly has gum disease in some form.

Seventy percent of adult tooth loss is attributed to gum disease. Recent research shows a link between patients who have gum disease and those who suffer from strokes, heart attacks, or complications with diabetes or pregnancy. Gum disease is silent in that early symptoms may be painless and mild, like swollen gums or bleeding while brushing. Regular dental check ups are vital because a professional can detect, treat, and reverse gum disease in early stages before major problems arise.

Cause and Effect

Several factors contribute to periodontal disease: plaque buildup, heredity, and lifestyle choices. By far, the most common and controllable factor is bacterial plaque, the sticky, colorless film produced by normal oral bacteria. Bacteria release toxins that break down the natural fibers that bond gums to teeth. When this occurs, pockets between the gums and teeth form, and more bacteria and toxins hide, flourish, and destroy your gums and teeth. Over time, this process can affect not only gums, teeth, and bone within the mouth, but also overall health. Bacteria in your mouth will be inadvertently ingested, and this can compromise your whole-body health.

Maintaining Good Periodontal Health

Regular dental visits at least every six months allow us to keep a watchful eye on the health of your gums. You should also brush twice a day, floss once a day, and use good mouth rinses at home. We will recommend the products that will optimize your oral homecare, and we can also show you the best methods for brushing and flossing. If you have overcome periodontal disease, we will recommend frequent check ups to ensure your mouth stays healthy for a lifetime.